Don't Text and Drive Public Service Campaign


November 26, 2013

At Montlick and Associates, our Atlanta personal injury attorneys regularly see the devastating impact of texting and driving on accident victims and their families.  While it can be tempting to check your cell phone when the familiar sound of an alert indicates that you have a new text message.  Every driver needs to consider whether any text is worth their life or the life of another.  Our personal injury lawyers are committed to motor vehicle safety, which is the motivation behind our Don’t Text and Drive Public Service Campaign television spots, which have aired throughout Georgia since 2009, in addition to our digital billboards, and television news segments in Atlanta.

While Georgia law prohibits all motorists from text messaging while operating a motor vehicle, the law has fallen short in terms of eliminating collisions involving drivers whose eyes, hands and concentration are diverted from focusing completely on the road and potential hazards.  While it might be tempting to presume that this type of high risk driving behavior is limited to teenage drivers, a study conducted by Pew Internet and American Life Project found that adults were more likely to text and drive than teen drivers.  The study revealed that 47 percent of adults who engage in the practice of text messaging admit texting behind the wheel while only 34 percent of teenagers age 16-17 admit to this unsafe driving practice.  The researchers also found that approximately 27 percent of all adult drivers engage in text messaging when operating a motor vehicle.

While any use of a cell phone while operating a motor vehicle can be hazardous, text messaging may be the most dangerous form of cell phone driving distraction.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that text messaging is six times more dangerous than driving with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 percent, the threshold at which a driver is considered legally impaired.  The federal vehicle safety agency also indicates that the average driver moves his or her eyes away from the road for 4.6 seconds when receiving or sending a text message.  At a speed of 55 miles per hour, a vehicle can travel more than the length of a football field during that period of time.

Our Georgia personal injury attorneys are committed to continuing to promote public awareness on the dangers of distracted driving because of the enormous toll it takes on texting accident victims, their families and our communities.  Text messaging claims the lives of more than 3,000 people and causes injury to 330,000 more each year according to a Harvard Center for Risk Analysis study.  The problem is so significant that texting and driving has now replaced intoxicated driving as the leading cause of car accidents and fatalities among teen drivers according to PRWEB.

At Montlick and Associates, we are committed to taking affirmative steps to protect our families, friends and neighbors from avoidable accidents caused by inattentive drivers.  Our Atlanta auto accident attorneys at Montlick and Associates are available to provide effective legal representation to those throughout all of Georgia, the Southeast and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state of Georgia.  No matter where you are located our Atlanta personal injury attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you.

Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333).  You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.