Car Accidents Can Lead to Osteoarthritis


April 01, 2016

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Arthritis can be genetic, but it can also develop due to severe trauma. Car accidents are a significant cause of arthritis and can result in inflammation of the joints in several areas of the body. Those who develop arthritis because of a car accident should be eligible to seek compensation from the at-fault party responsible for their injuries.

At Montlick and Associates, our car accident lawyers understand the difficulties faced by accident victims with arthritis. We know osteoarthritis injuries can result in substantial damages and can be hard to tie to the accident. Our law firm has assisted thousands of car accident victims with a wide array of injuries. We provide compassionate legal representation with zeal and attention to detail.

What is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis involves the erosion of cartilage on the ends of the bones. Cartilage is intended to prevent bones from running against each other at the joints. Without adequate cartilage, you will experience pain in the joints from the bones running together. Osteoarthritis can exist in any joint but is most common in the knees, hands, spine, and hips. There is no cure for this condition, but treatment can help to alleviate symptoms. 

Signs of Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis can be difficult to detect. Some common symptoms include pain, inflammation, and tenderness in the joints, along with stiffness, grinding sensation, and loss of flexibility. Doctors diagnose osteoarthritis by its symptoms as well as imaging, such as X-rays, MRIs, and blood tests.

Car Accidents as a Cause of Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis stemming from a car accident is known as post-traumatic osteoarthritis, and it is quite common. When a car accident damages a part of the body, this injury can later lead to osteoarthritis. The hip, knee, and ankle are common sites of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis sufferers can potentially pursue a personal injury claim against the at-fault driver responsible for the crash. To make such a claim, you will have to be diagnosed with osteoarthritis and the injury must be connected to the car accident. Osteoarthritis can take some time to develop after the car accident, which presents complications in personal injury actions. You should consult with a personal injury attorney for help in preparing a claim for your osteoarthritis injuries.

Osteoarthritis sufferers can find themselves coping with considerable medical expenses and forced to take time off work. Those with arthritis might need ongoing medical treatment and physical rehabilitation. All of these damages could be sought from the at-fault driver, depending upon the circumstances surrounding the crash. Your personal injury attorney can evaluate your accident and your injuries to assess the potential strength of your case and assist you in moving forward.

Put Our Law Firm's Over 30 Years of Legal Experience to Work For Your Case!

Montlick and Associates has been representing those who suffer serious injuries throughout all of Georgia and in the Southeast for over 30 years, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state.

No matter where you are located, our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Source:
http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/understanding-arthritis/

Category: Auto Accidents

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.