Myths About SSD Benefits


January 14, 2016

Social Security Disability (SSD) Benefits are designed to assist individuals with a prior work history who have become disabled and are in need of assistance. SSD benefits are available to those individuals with a sufficient work and tax history. These benefits are provided through payroll taxes and recipients are considered "insured" because they have worked for the qualifying number of years.

There is much misinformation swirling around Social Security Disability benefits. At Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law, our Georgia Social Security Attorneys meet many clients who are confused as to the SSD benefits process and might have been discouraged from applying due to misconceptions. In this article, we look at some common SSD myths in order to dispel false information that could negatively impact potential SSD benefit recipients.

Myth: You cannot work if you are applying for disability benefits.

There is a common belief among many that you cannot work if you intend to apply for Social Security Disability benefits. This belief is not necessarily grounded in fact. You can apply for SSD benefits even if you are currently working so long as your monthly gross income does not exceed a maximum figure set yearly by the government. Your lawyer can assist in analyzing your eligibility.

Myth: Younger individuals will not receive SSD benefits.

People in their twenties and thirties might believe that they will not be eligible for SSD benefits due to their youth. This is not true. If you have a disability that will prevent you from working for at least 12 months and have a sufficient work history, you should be eligible for SSD benefits, regardless of your age.

Myth: The Social Security Administration denies all first time claims for SSD benefits.

While some first time claims will be denied for a variety of reasons, it is not true that all claims for SSD benefits are denied. Those applicants who carefully complete the application and provide all necessary supporting documentation can be accepted the first time they apply. Having the assistance of a licensed lawyer can significantly improve your chance of being accepted. If your claim has been denied, you have the right to appeal this decision and many applicants are able to obtain benefits even following an initial denial.

Myth: Certain illnesses will automatically qualify you for disability benefits.

Some individuals enter the application process overconfident that they will be accepted due to their illness or condition. There is no particular disease or set of diseases that automatically qualifies you to be eligible to receive SSD benefits. The Social Security Administration looks to your disease's impact on your ability to work and not on the disease in and of itself. While some diseases might be more prone to affect the ability to work, all applications will be assessed individually. As such, complete your application with care regardless of your illness or condition.

Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law: Assisting Injured Employees in Receiving SSD Benefits

Successfully applying for SSD benefits can be a complex and time consuming process. The Georgia Social Security Attorneys at Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law assist you in applying for these important benefits. Our dedicated law firm provides professional assistance to those needing help with any social security matter across Georgia and in the Southeast. We have over 30 years of experience and will fight to see that you obtain the benefits to which you are entitled. Call Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law, 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Source:
https://www.ssa.gov/disabilityssi/

 


Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.