Electrocution Accident Attorneys: What You Need to Know


May 15, 2011

Electricity is a part of our everyday lives whether we like it or not. We come into contact with it when we turn on our lights, appliances, and tools and don't even think about it for the most part.

Surprisingly, electrocution accidents in this country are fairly common. Approximately 1000 people die from these types of accidents annually.

A broad range of factors may cause these tragic and debilitating accidents:

  • Defective products
  • Employer negligence
  • Faulty electrical outlets
  • Poor electrical wiring
  • Damaged electrical cords
  • Exposure to high-voltage power lines
  • Faulty machinery

When you are electrocuted, the shock enters the body at one point and then the current will follow a path and exit through another point on your body. The place where the electricity exits your body is commonly your feet. The path the electrical current chooses to follow through the body will vary depending on a number of factors including:

  • A person's muscle make-up
  • Victim’s overall health
  • Whether the victim’s body is wet
  • The point the electricity entered the body

Some of the injuries that victims can experience are severe burns, seizures, cardiac arrest, fractured bones, tissue and nerve damage or even death. In certain cases, the internal injuries are so great it can require amputation due to tissue and nerve damage to the extremity.

If you have been injured by electrocution while using a product such as a household appliance, power tools, or any other electricity-driven product, then you may be able to bring a product liability lawsuit against the manufacturer of the product for faulty design or manufacturing defects and recover the cost of your medical expenses, loss of wages and damages for your pain and suffering.

Workers on a job can be exposed to many electrical hazards and are often covered by workers' compensation laws of that state. These benefits that are provided by these claims are often not sufficient to cover all of a victim's losses. Our Georgia electrocution accident attorneys will investigate the circumstances of your workplace injury to identify third parties that may be liable in a personal injury claim or lawsuit.

Examples of situations where workers can be injured include:

  • There are not sufficient electrical warnings posted.
  • They are working on machinery, and the electricity is not properly shut down.
  • They have had inadequate training to safely work around electrical equipment.

We are all vulnerable to becoming victims of electrocution whether we are using a hair dryer or are working on overhead power lines. While most people have a healthy degree of respect for electricity, it is somewhat of a phantom threat because it is not visible to the human eye but can be deadly when it attacks.

If you or a loved one has experienced an accident as a result of electrocution that was caused by someone else's negligence, or was electrocuted on the job, contact our Georgia electrocution injury lawyers for a free no-obligation consultation. We will conduct an investigation into the circumstances around the incident to determine what happened and to help you protect your legal rights. Our experienced Atlanta electrocution accident lawyers are available to assist clients throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state. No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Personal Injury

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.