Atlanta Personal Injury Lawyers Explain Traumatic Amputation Claims


February 13, 2016

Undoubtedly, the loss of a body part due to an accident, also called a traumatic amputation, is nothing short of life changing and tragic. Sadly, over 130,000 new traumatic amputation related accidents occur each year in the United States, with roughly 20% stemming from accidents involving cars, trucks and those occurring on the job. In addition to the emotional and physical toll these accidents have victims, they also lead to thousands of dollars' worth of medical expenses to cover the surgeries, rehabilitation and prosthetic devices often necessary to help traumatic amputation victims heal and live their lives as normally as possible.

At Montlick and Associates, we fight hard for those who have suffered Catastrophic injury such as traumatic amputations. While no amount of money can replace a lost limb, it can at least help you to move on with your life with the peace of mind knowing you will have the financial security you deserve. Contact Montlick and Associates now to learn more about your legal rights in the event you have sustained a traumatic amputation related injury. We strive to provide all of our clients with the best representation possible and look forward to the potential of helping you with your case.

Traumatic Amputations Explained

There are two types of traumatic amputations – partial or complete. A partial amputation refers to a situation in which a limb, while gravely injured, is still connected to the body via tissue, bone or muscle. Conversely, a complete amputation is where the limb is completely severed from the body. Traumatic amputations are further classified by how they happened, as follows:

Crush amputation – this type of amputation occurs when a limb is literally crushed, which can lead to injury to the connective tissues and muscles far extending from the actual amputation site. Crush amputations most typically arise in vehicular accidents where a limb is pinned and crushed as a result of the impact.

Guillotine amputation – this type of amputation arises from a clean cut to a limb, resulting in either a partial or complete severing of the body part. Oftentimes, this type of injury occurs while on the job, primarily from a type of sharp machinery.

Avulsion amputation – this form of amputation occurs when a body part is stretched or torn from the tissue resulting in serious damage to bone, nerves, muscles, and blood vessels.

If you suffered from any of the above described forms of traumatic amputations due to the negligence of another, you deserve to be compensated to the fullest extent possible. Contact Montlick and Associates now to learn more about your legal rights and options. With any type of injury, you should never try and represent yourself, as it could prevent you from obtaining the money you need to cover your medical expenses and other injury related costs. Call us now to speak with one of our dedicated personal injury lawyers.

Montlick & Associates, P.C.: We Fight Hard for Our Injured Clients

At Montlick and Associates, we never want to hear about someone who has sustained serious injuries such as traumatic amputations. If you were catastrophically injured and don't know where to turn next, contact our Atlanta Personal Injury Lawyers for help. Our experienced firm strives to help you obtain the compensation you need to move on and live your life as normally as possible.

Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Personal Injury

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.