Georgia Workers’ Compensation Attorneys Discuss Restaurant Accidents


December 02, 2015

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, over 67,000 food preparation and service workers were injured on the job badly enough to require at least a day off work in 2008. About one fifth of these employees lost 31 or more days of work. The majority of injured restaurant employees suffered burns, cuts, sprains, or strains. A third of these injured workers experienced injuries to the hand or wrist and 22 percent damaged their back or shoulder. The following is a look at some common restaurant accidents and what you should do in the event you are injured while working at a restaurant.

Cutting, Slicing, and Cooking

Restaurant workers must often engage in a variety of cutting, slicing, and cooking tasks. Workers use sharp knives, food slicers, and work on hot surfaces. All of these tasks can result in serious injuries, including lacerations, burns, and loss of limbs. These injuries can require stitches, surgery, and extensive healing time. A serious cutting, slicing, or cooking injury could prevent the employee from working in the restaurant for a considerable period of time.

Repetitive Motion Injuries

Restaurant injuries do not encompass just cuts and burns. Certain conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, lower back pain, and tendonitis are not usually the result of sudden injuries, but rather develop gradually over time. These injuries are referred to as repetitive motion injuries. Some people also call them ergonomic injuries because they result from poorly designed equipment, tools, or work areas. Ergonomic hazards within the restaurant industry include lifting heavy boxes or other objects, standing for long periods of time, and performing repetitive food prep tasks that require the hand or wrist to move in an unnatural position.

Slip and Falls

Slip, trip, and falls are common in the restaurant industry, due in part to the often slick surfaces. The kitchen within any restaurant is a hot spot for slip and falls. Water from the sink and cooking operations tends to spill on the floor, creating a prime area for falls. Spilled food can also cause employees to slip. Restaurants require frequent mopping in the kitchen and other areas, resulting in often wet surfaces. Some employers are not stringent about the use of wet floor caution signs and unsuspecting employees could slip and fall.

Assault

Restaurants that handle large amounts of cash or are open late at night could pose the threat of violence to employees. Employers must take measures to ensure their employees are safe while working at all hours that the business is open, which could include taking security measures.

Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law: Put Our Over 30 Years of Experience to Work on Your Case!

If you injured on the job, contact the Georgia Workers' Compensation Attorneys at Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law. Our firm assists injured employees across Georgia and in the Southeast. We bring over 30 years of experience to your workers' compensation case, striving to provide you with the exceptional representation you need to obtain the best possible outcome. The sooner you act after your injury, the greater your chances of obtaining a full recovery. As such, it is important that you seek the assistance of a licensed lawyer as soon as possible. Call Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law, 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.


Source:
https://www.osha.gov/dte/grant_materials/fy09/sh-19478-09/roc_employer_ergo_manual.pdf


Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.