Georgia Workers’ Compensation Attorneys Discuss Injuries During Travel


November 01, 2015

Employees can be injured at any time while performing work duties, including while traveling. Confusion can arise as to an employee's right to workers' compensation if he or she is injured while traveling to and from the jobsite. Generally, employees will not be eligible for workers' compensation benefits if they are injured while commuting to work. However, several exceptions to this so-called "coming and going" rule do exist and many traveling employees will be covered if injured while on the road. Employees who fall into the following four categories will often receive workers' compensation coverage while traveling:

  1. Traveling to multiple job sites: You could be covered if injured in an accident while traveling if your job description involves travel to multiple job sites. Previous Georgia case law has held that when an employee uses his or her personal vehicle to travel to multiple job sites in one day, he or she is covered by workers' compensation because travel is an implied condition of employment. This exception will usually apply if you do not have a fixed location of employment, but come and go to multiple worksites.
  2. Business trips: If you are traveling for a business trip and become injured, you should be eligible for workers' compensation benefits. An employee acting within the course and scope of his or her employment while traveling for business is usually considered covered.
  3. Special errands or missions: If you are an employee who has been asked to perform a special errand or "mission" for your employer, you will likely be covered in the event you are injured while traveling. This could include being called into work several hours earlier than you were scheduled.
  4. Traveling is a part of your job: When your employer requires you to travel as a part of your job description, you will generally be covered under workers' compensation if injured while traveling. For instance, a bus driver, delivery truck driver, pilot or food delivery person are all required to travel. Their travel is for the benefit of the employer and should be covered under workers' compensation.

These are just a few of the most widely recognized exceptions that could allow employees who are injured while traveling to receive workers' compensation benefits. Contact an attorney if you are injured while traveling for your job. He or she will evaluate the circumstances surrounding your accident and uncover your best avenue for a full recovery. You should also be eligible for additional compensation if injured while traveling due to the negligent actions of a third party. Thus, contact an attorney as soon as possible to protect your legal rights.

Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law: Assisting Georgia's Injured Workers

If you have been injured in a workplace accident, contact the Georgia Workers' Compensation Attorneys at Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law. Our firm is dedicated to assisting those injured in the workplace across Georgia and in the Southeast. We bring over 30 years of experience to your workers' compensation case, providing you with the dedicated representation you need to obtain the best possible outcome. The sooner you act after your injury, the greater your chances of obtaining a full recovery. As such, it is important that you seek the assistance of an attorney as soon as possible. Call Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law, 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.


Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.