Construction Site Accidents, Injuries, and Deaths


October 28, 2015

In 2013, over 4,585 workers were killed on the job, according to the United States Department of Labor's Occupational Safety & Health Administration. This equates to 88 deaths a week and 12 deaths every single day. Approximately 20 percent of all worker deaths, that is one in five, were in construction. Falls are responsible for most construction site injuries and deaths. Other common causes of serious injuries and deaths include workers being struck by objects, becoming caught in between objects, and electrocutions at the job site. These are considered the "Fatal Four" of construction site injuries and caused more than half of all construction worker deaths in the year 2013.

Construction worker deaths are commonly in the news. A few months ago, a Georgia worker fell to his death while working on a residential home. OSHA became involved in the investigation and sought to determine whether safety regulations were violated on the construction site. Yet another construction worker death in the state was linked to a trench collapse and last year one worker died after falling from a water tower.

Some of the most common construction site accidents include:

• Falls from scaffolding or ladders
• Falling objects
• Cranes or building collapses
• Dangerous chemicals
• Electrocutions, fires, or explosions
• Defective tools or equipment

What to Do After a Construction Site Injury in Georgia

If you have been injured on the job while performing a construction related task, your first step will be to obtain the medical treatment you need. Construction accidents so often involve severe injuries that many victims will be rushed to the hospital. If your accident is not so serious as to require an ambulance, notify your superior of the accident and go to the nearest emergency room.

Your next step will be making sure that the appropriate party has been informed of your accident and any necessary forms are completed. Speak to your supervisor, who will inform you as to company policy for accident reporting. It is important to report any incident that results in injuries. At times, you might not immediately believe you have sustained a serious injury, only to find yourself in pain and requiring medical treatment days or weeks later. Waiting to report your accident could result in a bar to your recovery for medical expenses, lost wages and more under workers' compensation. As such, report any accidents to your employer so that a record exists and your legal rights can be protected.

Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law: Protecting Georgia Workers for Over 30 Years

If you are injured on the job, contact the Georgia Workers' Compensation Attorneys at Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law. We offer dedicated representation to injured workers across Georgia and in the Southeast. In fact, our firm brings over 30 years of experience to your case, providing you with the zealous representation you need to obtain protect your rights. We assist injured workers in obtaining workers' compensation benefits and additionally explore their right to recover outside of the workers' compensation system. The sooner you act after your injury, the greater your chances of obtaining a full recovery. As such, it is important that you seek the assistance of an attorney as soon as possible. Call Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law, 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.


Source:
https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html

 


Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.