The Most Common Workplace Injuries in Georgia


July 14, 2015

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, over 4,585 workers were killed on the job in the year 2013. This equates to approximately 88 worker deaths a week and 12 a day. While this figure is actually far lower than in the 1990's, it is still a frightening number that requires more attention to safety in the workplace. In addition to the thousands of worker deaths, OSHA (link downloads OSHA PDF) reports that over 3 million nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses were experienced in 2013. Over half of all these injuries required time off work, job transfers, or workplace restrictions.

Many workplace injuries are preventable and occur as a result of the employer's failure to maintain a safe work environment, which involves, among others, providing adequate training, safety equipment, oversight in the workplace, monitoring employee hours, and much more. The following is a look at some of the most common workplace injuries in Georgia and across the country. It is our hope that this list can help keep employees safe and assist employers in identifying common areas of concern.

  1. Overexertion injuries: Overexertion injuries will often result from lifting, carrying, pulling, holding, throwing, or pushing during the work day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (downloads pdf) reports that overexertion injuries are some of the most costly and disabling work related injuries, responsible for $13.4 billion in direct costs to employers every year.
  2. Slipping and tripping related injuries: Slip and fall accidents are a top cause of workplace injuries. These accidents can occur when employees slip on wet or otherwise slick surfaces, or when they trip on objects. Employers have a legal duty to maintain a safe work environment, which includes keeping the workplace free of known slipping or tripping hazards.
  3. Falling from heights: Falls from heights can include falls off of roofs, ladders, stairways, or other elevated surfaces. These falls can stem from slipping or tripping, as well as faulty equipment. Employers can reduce the risk of falls by ensuring employees are providing with personal protection gear, training employees thoroughly in fall prevention, and supervising employees working at any heights.
  4. Repetitive motion injuries: Repetitive motion injuries tend to develop slowly over time as a result of repetitive motions required by the employee's job. These injuries can include back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vision problems.
  5. Falling object injuries: Most commonly in the construction industry, objects can fall from elevated surfaces and cause serious injuries to employees below, most notably head injuries. Protective gear, such as helmets, can help to prevent falling object injuries in the workplace.

Dedicated Atlanta Worker's Compensation Lawyers Representing Injured Workers For Over 30 Years!

Our personal injury attorneys and Atlanta Worker's Compensation Lawyers provide aggressive representation, including workers' compensation claims, personal injury claims, and those that have developed asbestos-related diseases. Due to the fact that we have successfully represented thousands of injured people in personal injury cases and workers' compensation claims as well as families in wrongful death claims, we understand the physical, emotional and financial hardships faced by victims. We also understand what actions need to be taken in order to obtain compensation for our clients.

Montlick and Associates has been representing injured workers for over thirty years throughout all of Georgia and in the Southeast, including but not limited to all smaller cities and rural areas in the state. No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you.

Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Source:

https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html

 


Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.