Massive Recall on Fisher Price Toys Causing Injuries


October 01, 2010

Fisher Price, one of the leading brand names of children's toys, announced a massive recall of four separate products covering 11 million total units after injuries caused by the products created safety concerns. The Fisher Price recall covered tricycles, high chairs, toys with inflatable balls, and certain Little People toys. This massive recall is another in a history of recent problems for Fisher Price, which has had to recall products sixteen times since 2005.

During the same period, Fisher Price also was subject to a $2.3 million fine, which was the largest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission at the time. Fisher Price was also previously fined $1 million during the same period for failure to report thirty separate injuries involving the same Little People toy line that is subject to the current recall. Tragically, over 72,000 children younger than five are treated in emergency rooms each year for toy related injuries.

At Montlick and Associates, Attorneys at Law, we know that children are amongst the most vulnerable members of our society. Few experiences are more gut wrenching and traumatic than having a child seriously injured by a defective toy or other defective product. We have been representing children and their families who experience serious injuries and accidents from defective products like toys since 1984.

The toys and products subject to the current Fisher Price recall have all resulted in a number of injuries. The 7 million tricycles subject to recall caused genital bleeding from impact with a plastic key. The high chairs subject to recall caused injuries to a number of children by causing cuts and scrapes from parts that were intended for the storage tray. The most serious injuries involved the Fisher Price Little People recall which was the subject of the recent fine for failing to report prior injuries. The products from the Little People toy line that were recalled were found to be a choking hazard.

The toy industry is carefully regulated by both state and federal law to reduce the risk to children of dangerous and defective toys. Toys with small parts have been banned for children under the age of 3 since 1979. Toy manufacturers are not allowed to circumvent this restriction by simply labeling the toy "For children ages 3 and older." If the toy is the type of toy that would normally be used by a child under 3, labeling the toy for older children is not sufficient to avoid liability. Even if the toy is intended for older children, toys with small parts must be labeled as a choking hazard under the Child Safety Protection Act (CSPA). Choking is the leading cause of toy related fatalities, which most often results from swallowing balloons, balls and small toys or parts.

Fisher Price's previous industry-leading fine for violating the ban on the sale of toys with lead based paint is evidence of a serious problem. In 2007, Fisher Price announced that 1.5 million toys that had been manufactured in China were being recalled because of lead based paint. The issue of lead in products coming out of China has dominated the media in recent years. It has been estimated that 80% of all toys sold are manufactured in China. Even if the toys are manufactured in China, U.S. toy retailers may still be liable for selling the dangerous toy.

Lead exposure is a serious health risk for children that can lead to lifelong illness and even fatalities. Children are put at great risk when exposed to lead because their bodies absorb 50% of lead that they ingest as opposed to only 10% by adults. Children's bodies and brains are still developing which also increases the danger of lead tainted toys. High amounts of lead exposure can result in brain swelling, kidney disorders, bone marrow health issues, and even fatalities. Even lower levels of exposure has been linked to severe mental disabilities and behavioral disorders. It is important to seek a doctor immediately if you believe your child has been exposed to a toy with lead paint.

A child who has been injured by a dangerous toy or defective product may be able to seek compensation against the manufacturer, distributor, and/or retailer of the defective toy. The child who suffers toy related injuries may receive compensation for medical expenses, pain and suffering, and other economic losses. If you suspect your child has been injured by a dangerous toy with product defects, you should immediately seek medical treatment and then contact a qualified Georgia or Atlanta defective products attorney.

Call Montlick & Associates today to see how we can help. We are available to assist clients throughout all of Georgia, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state. Call us today for your free consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333), or visit us on the web at www.montlick.com. No matter where you are in Georgia, we are just a phone call away and we will even come to you.

Category: Personal Injury

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