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Insurance Companies Might Try to Trick You After an Accident


June 25, 2019

Getting into a car accident, even a minor one, is unnerving and upsetting.  Most people desire to do the right thing, but when suffering pain and discomfort due to injuries in a car accident, mistakes are made. One of the biggest mistakes accident victims make is calling the other driver’s insurance company right after a crash.

For almost 35 years, Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law, have assisted thousands of victims of auto accidents in winning monetary compensation for their injuries and losses stemming from a crash. Accident victims are often more concerned about seeking treatment for their injuries and getting healthy again than the legal ramifications of their actions, and insurance companies attempt to exploit victims' lack of experience as to the law in an effort to minimize, or even deny their claims. As such, accident victims can readily fall prey to unsavory insurance company tactics.  

No laws prevent insurance companies from contacting the victims of a car accident unless the company knows that the victim has legal representation. Insurance companies might take advantage of that situation by trying to influence the accident victim to accept a quick settlement or attempt to interview the victim on a recorded line.  Do not do this without first speaking with an attorneys. Insurance companies may reach out to accident victims at any time in order to accomplish their goals.

Insurance companies' interests are adverse to yours following an auto accident. 

Insurance company representatives who make decisions on your claim, called claims adjusters, are not concerned with your well-being. Their main concern is the company’s bottom line. Adjusters might try to get you to agree that you made a mistake and caused the crash or they may take out of context statements you make in order to argue that you are at fault, or not injured.  

Do not give a recorded statement without first consulting with an attorney.

You have no duty to provide the at-fault driver’s insurance company with a recorded statement.  In certain cases, you may be obligated to conduct a recorded statement with your own insurance carrier due to your contractual duty to cooperate, but you should consult with an attorney before doing so.  Often, an at-fault driver's insurance carrier may attempt to condition your property damage claim on you giving a recorded statement or the adjuster might explain that it is necessary for their investigation.  Insurance companies could ask you how badly you were hurt. This is an especially unfair tactic because most injuries, especially the musculoskeletal ones, take some time to manifest symptoms and victims do not typically know the severity of the injury until they have endured medical treatment, such as physical therapy, or undergone x-rays or MRIs. However, the statements you make in a recorded statement can be used against you later in court. 

Put Our Law Firm's Over 35 Years Of Legal Experience To Work For Your Case!

If you have been injured by any type of accident caused by someone else's negligence, call Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law for your free consultation today. Montlick & Associates, Attorneys at Law has been representing those who suffer serious injuries for over 35 years.

No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour live chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.