Drivers Who Use Cell Phones Likely to Engage in Other Unsafe Driving Practices


July 29, 2014

As if using a cell phone while driving is not risky enough, a study conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety indicates that drivers who engage in this dangerous driving practice are more likely to engage in other unsafe driving practices.  The study revealed that motorists using cell phones are more likely to engage in drowsy driving, speeding or driving without a seat belt.  Ironically, the report revealed that 89 percent of those in the study believe other drivers talking on a cell phone threatens their safety, but 69 percent of individuals in the study admitted to doing just that during the preceding thirty day period.

The study found that drivers tend to have a “do as I say not as I do” attitude toward talking on a cell phone while driving. Nine in ten people in the study expressed the opinion that distracted driving is a bigger problem than it was three years ago, but these same drivers tended to continue to carry on cell phone conversations behind the wheel.  While using a cell phone distracts a drivers eyes, mind and hands from the act of driving, the most alarming part of the study is that drivers often combine multiple unsafe driving practices.

Drivers who admitted to talking on a cell phone while driving during the prior one month period also reported simultaneously engaging in the following dangerous driving practices:

  • Sending an Email or Text: 53 percent
  • Speeding: 65 percent
  • Drowsy driving: 44 percent
  • No seat belt: 29 percent

By contrast, drivers who abstained from talking on a cell phone while driving also tended to engage in other unsafe driving practices at a comparably low rate:

  • Drowsy Driving: 14
  • Speeding: 31 percent
  •  Sending Email or Text: 3 percent
  • No Seat Belt: 16 percent

Georgia personal injury attorney David Montlick commented, “What is especially concerning about this study is that it goes beyond the danger posed by cell phone use.  Despite understanding the risk associated with talking on a cell phone while driving, the study suggests that certain drivers are willing to continue using their phone and engage in a range of other high risk driving behaviors.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that distracted driving causes the death of an estimated 3,000 people annually while causing injury to almost 500,000 more.  The federal traffic safety agency also reports that these numbers are understated because of the challenge associated with obtaining evidence of distracted driving as the cause of an auto accidents.  Cell phone use while driving negatively impacts reaction time and quadruples the probability that a motorist will be involved in a collision according to AAA.

If you or a family member is injured in a collision caused by a distracted driver, you might have a right to financial compensation. 

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Our attorneys at Montlick and Associates have been representing those who suffer serious injuries throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast for over thirty years, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state.  No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333).  You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat. 

Sources:

 http://newsroom.aaa.com/tag/car-accident/

Category: Auto Accidents

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