Montlick and Associates Joins the DOT in Promoting Child Passenger Safety Week


October 04, 2013

At Montlick and Associates, our Georgia auto accident attorneys are firmly committed to promoting vehicle safety for kids of all ages, which ranges from infants in child safety restraints to teenagers driving on their own for the first time.  As part of this commitment, we ask parents to revisit important motor vehicle safety tips during this period which has been designated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as Child Passenger Safety Week.

According to the DOT website, the purpose of Child Passenger Safety Week is to emphasize the benefits of properly securing kids in seat belts, car seats and booster seats based on the age and weight of the child.  While proper safety restraints can prevent injury and wrongful death to vehicle occupants of all ages, safety restraints are especially important for kids because car accidents remain the leading cause of death for children according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The importance of securing infants, children and teens in a proper safety restraint during every car ride is established by the effectiveness of this safety precaution.  The DOT reports that proper use of a car seat can reduce the risk of fatal injury to a child passenger by more than seventy percent for infants and by more than half for toddlers.  The benefits of proper safety restraints are not limited to babies and toddlers because children who are using a booster seat are almost sixty percent less likely to suffer injury than a child who is merely secured with a seat belt.

The DOT estimates that car seats prevented the deaths of approximately 10,000 children age five and under between the years of 1975 and 2011.  The federal agency also has indicated that the hundreds of children whose lives are saved by car seats annually could be increased significantly with more consistent use of child safety restraint systems.  Car seats that are easier to properly install also could increase the number of kids whose lives are saved because many parents fail to properly install car seats.  This failure frequently results from inadequate instructions from the manufacturer of the safety restraint system or a poor fit between the vehicle and the car seat or booster seat.

The tragic reality is that many car accident-related injuries that permanently impact a child’s quality of life or that cause wrongful death could be prevented by consistent use of child safety restraint systems.  The DOT reports that approximately a third of all fatal car accidents that cause the death of a child under the age of 13 involve kids who are not buckled up appropriately in a seat belt or car seat.

Our Child Passenger Safety Program at Montlick and Associates has been a part of our commitment to keeping kids safe in cars since 1984.  If your child is injured in a car accident, our Georgia motor vehicle collision lawyers at Montlick and Associates are available to provide effective legal representation to those throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state.  No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333).  You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

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