Strategies for Preventing Teen Distracted Driving Car Accidents in Georgia


February 14, 2013

The dangers of distracted teen driving have been well documented, because inattentive driving is the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S. according to a study conducted by National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in conjunction with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The NHTSA reports teen alcohol-impaired accidents have declined in recent years, but the overall fatality rate for teenage drivers has remained constant because of the increase in distracted driving by teenagers.

While many states like Georgia have attempted to address the risk of car accidents caused by teens who fail to focus their full attention on the road through legislation, many teen drivers continue to disregard bans on the use of cell phones while driving. Georgia enacted distracted driving laws approximately two years ago, but only 1,200 tickets have been issued according to the Department of Driver Services. Georgia law bans text messaging by all drivers and any use of cell phones by teen drivers. However, a reporter at WSBTV has reported that fewer than three dozen drivers under the age of 18 have been cited.

The limited number of arrests and nominal fines associated with Georgia’s anti-cell phone laws have compromised their effectiveness. However, a number of iOS and Android apps offer parents additional tools for preventing their teens from being involved in cell phone-related car accidents. Some of these apps allow teen drivers to put a lock on the texting feature of the phone so that the teen must make a responsible choice. Other apps can be controlled by a parent or can sense when a vehicle is moving and automatically disable cell phones from texting or calling.

Although distracted driving poses a risk comparable to alcohol-impaired driving, teens do not have similar attitudes toward both of these forms of unsafe operation of a motor vehicle. While only ten percent of teen drivers admit to driving drunk, ninety percent admit to seeing another teen driver using a cell phone or a passenger distracting a teen driver.

While teen drivers distracted by cell phones may get the most public attention, there are many forms of driver distraction that cause teen driving accidents. Eighty percent of drivers admit to engaging in unsafe forms of multi-tasking when driving, such as steering with one foot, changing clothes, manicuring nails and shaving according to a Mutual Insurance Survey.

When drivers run red lights and strike pedestrians in crosswalks or veer into an adjacent lane because they are looking down at a cell phone screen, they may be liable for injuries caused by their distracted driving. Our experienced distracted driving attorneys at Montlick and Associates may be able to seek a wide range of damages, including compensation for lost wages, medical expenses, permanent disability, pain and suffering, impact on one’s quality of life, property damage and other forms of loss.

Our Georgia accident lawyers at Montlick and Associates are available to provide effective legal representation to clients throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state. No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

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Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.