25 Car Pileup Serves Notice Weather Related Accident Season Has Arrived


January 17, 2013

A multi-car pileup in the Midwest that was caused by the first significant snowstorm of the season serves as notice that winter weather has arrived. While the 25 car pile-up that resulted in one fatality and many injuries was caused by snow, these types of dangerous collisions may be caused by forms of adverse weather that we see more frequently in Atlanta, like fog and rain.

While bad weather may be a key factor in these multi-car collisions, driver error usually also plays an important role in starting the chain reactions involving a large number of vehicles.

Collisions involving all types of motor vehicles including cars, semi-trucks, motorcycles and SUVs are far more common when poor weather strikes. Adverse weather conditions can take many forms, including dense fog, heavy rain, hail, gusty winds and even snow. Prudent driving practices become even more important when drivers are coping with poor driving conditions caused by hostile weather. If you are involved in a multi-car accident with three or more vehicles, the driver responsible for your injuries may also be a victim of another unsafe driver whose poor driving initiated the accident.

Because these type of chain reaction collisions cause injuries to multiple parties, they can pose complex challenges in terms of litigation and settlement. There will generally be multiple injury victims and defendants each with their own insurance company. There may also be multiple forms of negligent driving committed by different defendants. Some or all of those involved in the collision may be both an injury victim and a defendant. Multi-car accidents of this nature become even more complicated if the driver whose unsafe driving caused your injuries does not have sufficient insurance coverage to compensate all of the victims that were injured by the driver’s negligence.

Although most drivers appropriately modify their driving behavior in response to inclement weather and poor road conditions, some drivers continue to travel at the maximum allowable speeds or even violate the speed limit. Poor weather can affect braking distance, ability to see hazards, vehicle traction, stopping distance and emergency driving responses to road hazards.

While some motorists hesitate to pursue personal injury claims that occur in adverse weather because they feel that the accident was unavoidable, this is rarely the case. Most weather-related collisions could be averted if all drivers conform their driving behavior to weather conditions. Generally, this means decreasing speed and increasing following distance to compensate for less visibility and longer stopping distances.

If you or a close family member is injured by a driver who is speeding or following too closely despite wet or slippery road conditions, our experienced Georgia auto accident attorneys represent accident victims throughout the greater Atlanta area. Montlick and Associates is available to provide effective legal representation to clients throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state.

No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

Please Note:
Many of our blog articles discuss the law. All information provided about the law is very general in nature and should not be relied upon as legal advice. Every situation is different, and should be analyzed by a lawyer who can provide individualized advice based on the facts involved in your unique situation, and a consideration of all of the nuances of the statutes and case law that apply at the time.