Motorcycle Helmets That Fail to Meet DOT Safety Standards Recalled


February 05, 2013

Motorcycles provide less protection in collisions than other motor vehicles because they lack metal frames, safety restraints and airbags. Operators and passengers of motorcycles account for 14 percent of motor vehicle accident fatalities despite accounting for less than one percent of all vehicle miles traveled, according to the CDC.

Helmets essentially provide the main form of effective safety equipment to reduce the severity of injuries experienced in a motorcycle accident. Because motorcycle helmets are highly effective in preventing traumatic brain injuries and fatalities related to head injuries, the recent report of a recall of motorcycle helmets that do not comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) safety is concerning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has announced a recall of about 4,600 motorcycle helmets manufactured by Tegol, Inc. The company has indicated that defects associated with the helmets mean that they will not provide adequate head protection in the event of a motorcycle crash. The motorcycle helmets subject to recall do not meet minimum standards established by the DOT for impact attenuation, penetration or labeling. The company is asking bikers who purchased these helmets to contact the manufacturer about obtaining a refund or replacement.

While failing to wear a motorcycle helmet is extremely dangerous, the false sense of security that comes from using a helmet that does not comply with mandatory safety standards is almost as problematic. The effectiveness of motorcycle head gear in protecting riders is reflected by NHTSA findings comparing states with universal helmet laws to those that do not have similar requirements. The agency found that only 12 percent of fatal motorcycle accident victims were not wearing helmets in universal helmet law states whereas almost two-thirds of those who died in motorcycle accidents were not wearing helmets in partial helmet law states. In states with no motorcycle helmet laws, nearly 3 in 4 riders who died in a motorcycle crash were not wearing a motorcycle helmet.

There has been a trend toward repealing universal helmet laws because they are opposed by many motorcycle clubs and other motorcycle enthusiasts. However, data gathered over a quarter of a decade by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) indicates that motorcycle helmets reduce the risk of suffering a fatal head injury by 35 percent. Georgia's mandatory helmet law is based in part on statistics gathered by the Georgia Department of Transportation that indicate motorcyclists are involved in only .06 percent of all motor vehicle collisions, but are 72 percent more likely to suffer fatal injuries.

If you are injured by a driver of a passenger vehicle who is speeding, distracted or impaired by drugs or alcohol, you may have the right to seek compensation for your injuries. These factors and other violations of traffic laws in Georgia can result in serious accidents that cause permanent injury. Whether your injuries are caused by a defective bike, negligent driver or unsafe roadway, we are committed to seeking the financial compensation that motorcycle accident victims need to rebuild their lives.

Our experienced Georgia motorcycle accident lawyers at Montlick and Associates are available to provide effective legal representation to clients throughout all of Georgia and the Southeast, including but not limited to Albany, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Marietta, Rome, Roswell, Savannah, Smyrna, Valdosta, Warner Robins and all smaller cities and rural areas in the state. No matter where you are located our attorneys are just a phone call away, and we will even come to you. Call us 24 hours a day/7 days a week for your Free Consultation at 1-800-LAW-NEED (1-800-529-6333). You can also visit us online at www.montlick.com and use our Free Case Evaluation Form or 24-hour Live Online Chat.

Category: Auto Accidents

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